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Journalism

Research of May 2022

Patricia Cruz

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Here is a list of all academic peer-reviewed articles, reports and other papers published in May 2022 about journalism research. The bolded titles have JRN articles written about the studies.

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Published Title Author(s) Journal / publisher
2022-05-01 The Rise of the Brazilian Fact-checking Movement: Between Economic Sustainability and Editorial Independence Thales Lelo Journalism Studies
2022-05-02 Community Media Coverage of Gender Issues: Struggles and Successes in Rural India Annapurna Sinha
Journal of Communication Inquiry
2022-05-03 The Journalist and the Manipulator: Walter Lippmann, Karl Mannheim, and the Case for a “New Objectivity” to Check Demagoguery Ronald P. Seyb American Journalism
2022-05-03 The politics of international broadcasters: A comparison between Indonesia and Australia Masduki
International Communication Gazette
2022-05-03 Philosemitism in contemporary German media Irit Dekel
Media, Culture & Society
2022-05-03 Understanding the effects of social news use on citizen participation among young Singaporean adults: A communication mediation model approach Winston Jin Song Teo Communication Research and Practice
2022-05-03 The “major mea culpa:” Journalistic Discursive Techniques When Professional Norms are Broken Erica Salkin &Kevin Grieves Journalism Studies
2022-05-03 Political Misinformation and Factual Corrections on the Facebook News Feed: Experimental Evidence Ethan Porter, Thomas J. Wood The Journal of Politics
2022-05-03 Covid-19 and Race: News Coverage of Structural Racism and the Role of John Henryism and Racial Weathering in Bame Covid-19 Deaths Tina Sikka
Javnost – The Public
2022-05-04 Why people don’t pay for news: A qualitative study Tim Groot Kormelink
Journalism
2022-05-04 Performing the disaster genre? TV journalism, disruptive factors and community challenges in the reporting of the UK Grenfell Tower block fire Julian Matthews
Journalism
2022-05-04 “Must know Photoshop”: proprietary skills and media jobs in Australia Sarah Keith, Stephen Collins
Media International Australia
2022-05-04 “Must know Photoshop”: proprietary skills and media jobs in Australia Sarah Keith, Stephen Collins
Media International Australia
2022-05-04 Unruly female spectators at the Melbourne Cup in Australia: media discourses about women and alcohol consumption Tania McHendrie, Carole Zufferey, Snjezana Bilic & Cassandra Loeser Feminist Media Studies
2022-05-04 Performing the disaster genre? TV journalism, disruptive factors and community challenges in the reporting of the UK Grenfell Tower block fire Julian Matthews
Journalism
2022-05-05 Stay Strong, Get Perspective, or Give Up: Role Negotiation in Small-Scale Investigative Journalism Pauline Cancela & Annik Dubied Journalism Studies
2022-05-06 A Vicious Cycle? Threat of Terror, Perceived Media Bias, and Support for Surveillance Policies Ruta Kaskeleviciute & Jörg Matthes Mass Communication and Society
2022-05-06 Pixel politics and satellite interpretation in the Syrian war Fiona A Greenland
Media, Culture & Society
2022-05-07 Journey to the stars program: the gendered and generational governance of professionalization on Wattpad Anthony Twarog Critical Studies in Media Communication
2022-05-09 Researching Experience in Journalism: Theory, Method, and Creative Practice Cristina Archetti Journalism Studies
2022-05-09 Understanding of Majority Opinion Formation in Online Environments Through Statistical Analysis of News, Documentary, and Comedy YouTube Channels Taehyun Ha
Social Science Computer Review
2022-05-09 How to Increase News Literate Behaviors Via Interventions: Eight Guidelines by Early Adolescents S. L. Tamboer, S. Daalmans, I. Molenaar, T. Bosse, M. Kleemans
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator
2022-05-09 Guide de visionnement critique des médias, tome 1: par la réflexion individuelle et en groupe François-René Lord Canadian Journal of Communication
2022-05-09 On Black Canadian Media Studies: A Conversation with Cheryl Thompson Cheryl Thompson,
Chris Russill
Canadian Journal of Communication
2022-05-09 Ontario’s Right-Wing Populism “Will Cost You”: A Propaganda Analysis of Ford’s Sticker Act and Canadian Journalism’s Response Sydney L. Forde Canadian Journal of Communication
2022-05-09 Deciphering the Decline: A Computational Analysis of Two Decades of Canadian Newspaper Op-Eds on Freedom of Information Alex Luscombe, Kevin Walby Canadian Journal of Communication
2022-05-10 Joining the Dots: The Literacies of Multimodal Longform Journalism Andrew Duffy Digital Journalism
2022-05-10 The blurring line between freelance journalists and self-employed media workers Beate Josephi, Penny O’Donnell
Journalism
2022-05-10 The blurring line between freelance journalists and self-employed media workers Beate Josephi, Penny O’Donnell
Journalism
2022-05-11 The blind spots of measuring online news exposure: a comparison of self-reported and observational data in nine countries Sandra González-Bailón & Michael A. Xenos Information, Communication & Society
2022-05-11 The invention of Chinese “media tradition”: Mediatization of festival tradition and family cultural reproduction in contemporary China Zhuoxiao Xie
Global Media and China
2022-05-11 Exploring “ideological correction” in digital news updates of Portland protests & police violence Sydney L Forde, Robert E Gutsche, Jr, Juliet Pinto
Journalism
2022-05-11 Seeing red: Reading uncivil news comments guided by personality characteristics Arthur D. Santana, Toby Hopp
Newspaper Research Journal
2022-05-11 How fact-checkers delimit their scope of practices and use sources: Comparing professional and partisan practitioners Nathan L.T. Tsang, Mengzhe Feng, Francis L.F. Lee
Journalism
2022-05-11 Introduction: media and fakery Wyatt Moss-Wellington, Celia Lam & Filippo Gilardi Continuum
2022-05-13 Selective Control: The Political Economy of Censorship Cristina Corduneanu-Huci & Alexander Hamilton Political Communication
2022-05-13 Editorial Journalism and Environmental Issues in the Majority World Shafiq Ahmad Kamboh, Muhammad Ittefaq, Muhammad Yousaf International Journal of Communication
2022-05-13 An interreality study of race and homicide news coverage in Baton Rouge, Louisiana Tim V Klein, Quincy Hodges
Crime, Media, Culture: An International Journal
2022-05-13 Extracting Primary Emotions and Topics from the Al-Hayat Media Centre Magazine Publications, Using Topic Modelling and Lexicon-Based Approaches Konstantinos E. Maragkos, Petros E. Maravelakis
Social Science Computer Review
2022-05-13 The domestication of “the Arab Spring”: A comparison of news framing in the United States and South Korea Jae Sik Ha
Newspaper Research Journal
2022-05-13 ‘Abba Kyari did not die of Coronavirus’: Social media and fake news during a global pandemic in Nigeria Temple Uwalaka
Media International Australia
2022-05-13 Local News on Facebook: How Television Broadcasters use Facebook to Enhance Social Media News Engagement Miao Guo &Fu-Shing Sun Journalism Practice
2022-05-13 All the News that’s Fit to Watch: How the New York Times Uses Video on Facebook Jeremy Saks & Pamela E. Walck Journalism Practice
2022-05-13 How Can the Private Media Be Strengthened to Investigate and Expose Corruption in Ghana? Understanding Ghanaian Perspectives Joseph Yaw Asomah Journalism Practice
2022-05-15 Analysis of national scientific domains in the journalism discipline (scopus, 2003–2019) María Victoria Nuño-Moral, Magdalena Trillo-Domínguez, Vicente P Guerrero-Bote, Félix Moya-Anegón
Journalism
2022-05-15 Paradoxical inclusion of India’s ex-untouchables in New Casteist media Ali Saha, Samanthi Gunawardana
Media, Culture & Society
2022-05-15 Political communication, press coverage and public interpretation of public health statistics during the coronavirus pandemic in the UK B.T. Lawson, Jairo Lugo-Ocando
European Journal of Communication
2022-05-15 Queer media generations: Shifting identifications and media uses among non-heterosexual men Alexander Dhoest, Joris Van Ouytsel European Journal of Communication
2022-05-16 Decolonizing Conflict Journalism Studies: A Critical Review of Research on Fixers Johana Kotišová & Mark Deuze Journalism Studies
2022-05-16 Avoiding real news, believing in fake news? Investigating pathways from information overload to misbelief Edson C Tandoc, Jr, Hye Kyung Kim
Journalism
2022-05-16 Networked agenda flow between elite U.S. newspapers and Twitter: A case study of the 2020 Black Lives Matter movement Yan Su
Journalism
2022-05-16 The structures that shape news consumption: Evidence from the early period of the COVID-19 pandemic Jacob L Nelson, Seth C Lewis
2022-05-16 Ink in their veins? Distorting archetypes, family newspapers, and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Jeanna Sybert
Journalism
2022-05-16 Communicating Cultism in the Media: Discursive Sense-Giving of Cult Status Kyle A. Hammonds, Michael W. Kramer
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
2022-05-16 Moderation Effects of Language Skills, Residential Tenure, and Education on Immigrants’ Learning From News Yulia S. Medvedeva, Glenn M. Leshner
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
2022-05-16 What Constitutes Disinformation? Disinformation Judgment, Influence of Partisanship, and Support for Anti-Disinformation Legislation Francis L. F. Lee
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
2022-05-16 A Matter of Perspective: An Experimental Study on Potentials of Constructive Journalism for Communicating a Crisis Svenja Schäfer, Hannah Greber, Michael Sülflow, Sophie Lecheler
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
2022-05-16 Social Media Policies in U.S. Television Newsrooms: Changes over Time Anthony C. Adornato, Allison Frisch
Electronic News
2022-05-16 Communicating Cultism in the Media: Discursive Sense-Giving of Cult Status Kyle A. Hammonds, Michael W. Kramer Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
2022-05-16 Moderation Effects of Language Skills, Residential Tenure, and Education on Immigrants’ Learning From News Yulia S. Medvedeva, Glenn M. Leshner
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
2022-05-16 “It’s Not Hate but … ”: Marginal Categories in Rural Journalism Gregory Perreault, Ruth Moon, Jessica Fargen Walsh & Mildred F. Perreault Journalism Practice
2022-05-16 Sports Journalism’s Uncertain Future: Navigating the Current Media Ecosystem in the Wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic Patrick C. Gentile, Nicholas R. Buzzelli, Sean R. Sadri & Zachary W. Arth Journalism Studies
2022-05-16 In Search of the Global South: Assessing Attitudes of Latin American Journalists to Artificial Intelligence in Journalism María T. Soto-Sanfiel, Adriana Ibiti, Mabel Machado, Beatriz Elena Marín Ochoa, María Mendoza Michilot, Claudio Guillermo Rosell Arce & Ariadna Angulo-Brunet Journalism Studies
2022-05-18 Journalism: Mirror on a “Decaying” Arab World Lawrence Pintak
Digital Journalism
2022-05-18 The Generative Dialogue Framework and the Pursuit of Better Listening by Journalists: A Design-Centered Approach for More Constructive Conversations with Audiences Dimitra Dimitrakopoulou & Seth C. Lewis
Digital Journalism
2022-05-18 The Impact of Public Transparency Infrastructure on Data Journalism: A Comparative Analysis between Information-Rich and Information-Poor Countries Lindita Camaj, Jason Martin & Gerry Lanosga Digital Journalism
2022-05-18 Considering Interinstitutional Visibilities in Combating Misinformation Introduction to Special Issue: Fighting Fakes: News Publishers, Fact-Checkers, Platform Companies, and Policymaking Valérie Bélair-Gagnon, Lucas Graves, Bente Kalsnes, Steen Steensen & Oscar Westlund Digital Journalism
2022-05-18 Native Advertising on News Websites: The Impacts of Media Organizational Factors on Disclosure Clarity You Li & Ye Wang Digital Journalism
2022-05-18 Uneasy Bedfellows: AI in the News, Platform Felix M. Simon Digital Journalism
2022-05-19 Shielding Democracy: Foreign Correspondent Coverage Of The 1981 Military Coup Attempt In Spain In The Economist, Time And Newsweek Christopher D. Tulloch Media History
2022-05-19 “Good morning, COVID!” the inertia of journalistic imaginaries in morning shows’ online comments Robert E Gutsche, Jr, Sydney L Forde, Juliet Pinto, , , Yanqi Zhu Journalism
2022-05-19 Islamic Worldview As A Model For De-Westernising Journalism Studies And Profession Basyouni Ibrahim Hamada Javnost – The Public
2022-05-20 A Partition of the Public Sphere:
Violence, state repression and the press in India and Pakistan, 1947–1949
Aritra Majumdar Media History
2022-05-21 Developing media and information literacy competencies: a case study in rural schools in Yunnan Province, China Stephen M. Croucher,Mingsheng Li,Ying Huang,Xiaohui Pan,Gang Yuan &Ying Kou Journal of Applied Communication Research
2022-05-21 A Clash of Ideals:
The Introduction of Televised Information in Sweden, 1969–1972
Emil Stjernholm Media History
2022-05-22 Mapping an online production network: The field of ‘actual play’ media Alex Chalk
Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies
2022-05-22 Debating News Media: Politics, Identities, and Alternatives in the Greek Mediascape Aikaterini Nikolopoulou, Elena Psyllakou & Nicolas Demertzis Journalism Studies
2022-05-22 Troublemakers in the Streets? A Framing Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Protests in the UK 1992−2017 Johannes B. Gruber
The International Journal of Press/Politics
2022-05-22 Mapping an online production network: The field of ‘actual play’ media Alex Chalk
Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies
2022-05-23 Peripheral Science Journalism: Scientists and Journalists Dancing on the Same Floor Avshalom Ginosar, Ifat Zimmerman & Tali Tal Journalism Practice
2022-05-23 Slow Journalism: A Systematic Literature Review Inês Mendes & Sandra Marinho Journalism Practice
2022-05-23 Evaluating “exemplary data journalism” from Asia: An exploration into South China Morning Post’s data stories on China and the world Shangyuan Wu
Journalism
2022-05-24 Honesty, morality, and parasocial relationships in U.S. children’s media Nancy A. Jennings, Sarah F. Rosaen, Omotayo Banjo & Vanessa McCoy Journal of Children and Media
2022-05-24 Young adults’ social network practices and the development of their media literacy competences: a quantitative study Camille Tilleul Information, Communication & Society
2022-05-25 News as religion: Practices of mediation in a Catholic community in South India Deepika Rose Alex, Subin Paul
Newspaper Research Journal
2022-05-25 Third-party candidates, newspaper editorials, and political debates John F. Kirch
Newspaper Research Journal
2022-05-25 The (r)evolution of transsexuality in the news media: The case of the Spanish digital press (2000-2020) Rubén Olveira-Araujo
Journalism
2022-05-25 Modeling Media History:
On topic models of Swedish media politics 1945–1989
Pelle Snickars Media History
2022-05-25 Rethinking the Expertise of Data Journalists: A Case Study Jingrong Tong International Journal of Communication
2022-05-25 Media Visibility of Femininity and Care: UK Women’s Magazines’ Representations of Female “Keyworkers” During COVID-19 Shani Orgad, Catherine Rottenberg International Journal of Communication
2022-05-26 Skeptical Inertia in the Face of Polarization: News Consumption and Misinformation in Turkey Çiğdem Bozdağ, Suncem Koçer Media and Communication
2022-05-26 Ideological and economic influences on journalistic autonomy and cynicism: A moderating role of digital adaptation of news organizations Bumsoo Kim, Borae Jin
Journalism
2022-05-26 The effects of constructive journalism techniques on mood, comprehension, and trust Natasha van Antwerpen, Rachel A. Searston, Deborah Turnbull, Liesbeth Hermans, Petra Kovacevic
Journalism
2022-05-26 Ideological and economic influences on journalistic autonomy and cynicism: A moderating role of digital adaptation of news organizations Bumsoo Kim, Borae Jin
Journalism
2022-05-26 Indonesian English-language magazine reports on the British occupation of Indonesia Muhammad Yuanda Zara Media History
2022-05-26 #MeToo Academia: News Coverage of Sexual Misconduct at U.S. Universities Stine Eckert, Jade Metzger-Riftkin, Fatima Albrehi, Najma Akhther, Zalika Aniapam & Linda Steiner Journalism Practice
2022-05-26 Strengthening Journalism from the Margins: Engaged Journalism in Brazil and Egypt Débora Medeiros & Hanan Badr Digital Journalism
2022-05-26 The Images of News Media Perceived by People as Antecedent of News Use H. Denis Wu
Journalism & Communication Monographs
2022-05-26 News Media Image: A Typology of Audience Perspectives Soo Young Shin
Journalism & Communication Monographs
2022-05-29 Facebook Comments Influence Perceptions of Journalistic Bias: Testing Hostile Media Bias in the COVID-19 Social Media Environment Sherice Gearhart, Ioana A. Coman, Alexander Moe, Sydney Brammer
Electronic News
2022-05-29 The Intertwining of the Covid-19 Pandemic with Democracy Backlash: Making Sense of Journalism in Crisis Mojca Pajnik & Majda Hrženjak Journalism Practice
2022-05-29 The Influence of Media Trust and Normative Role Expectations on the Credibility of Fact Checkers Florian Primig Journalism Practice
2022-05-30 Deathlogging: GoPros as forensic media in accidental sporting deaths James N Gilmore
Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies
2022-05-30 Political stability and subnational media systems: Comparing Bahia and the Federal District (Brazil) Julián Durazo-Herrmann & Fábio Henrique Pereira Communication Research and Practice
2022-05-30 Postcolonial feminism and non-fiction cinema: gendered subjects in Alba Sotorra’s war documentaries Anna Fonoll-Tassier, Núria Araüna Baró & Laia Quílez Esteve Feminist Media Studies
2022-05-31 Outdated or innovative? Examining news practices that have stood the test of time at one of Australia’s longest-serving local newspapers Alison McAdam, Kristy Hess
Media International Australia
2022-05-31 The Innovation of Values: Exploring the Role of News Media Exposure and Communication in Moral Progress in the Netherlands Piet Verhoeven Mass Communication and Society
2022-05-31 Using Journalism for Self-Protection: Profession-Specific and Journalistic Measures and Strategies for Countering Violence and Impunity in Mexico and Honduras Tamsin S. Mitchell Journalism Studies
2022-05-31 Frames and Journalistic Roles in Chinese Reporting on HIV: Insights from a Content Analysis and Interviews Focused on Verbal and Visual Modalities* Chunbo Ren & Viorela Dan Journalism Studies

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Journalism

Article: Trust and Journalistic Transparency Online

Patricia Cruz

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The study “Trust and Journalistic Transparency Online” by Michael Koliska from Georgetown University experimented on news consumers’ trust as brought on by transparency, and further, in the second experiment, explored the reasons for the findings in the first.

Transparency in journalism is defined as opening up the journalistic processes (production, decision making) to outsiders, i.e. making journalism more transparent. Karlsson (2010, 2020) further divides transparency into disclosure, participatory, and ambient transparency. 

Defining trust, on the other hand, in journalism has been tricky, as it has been associated with credibility. Kohring and Matthes (2007) define the four elements of trust: 1. trust in topic selectivity; 2. trust in fact selectivity; 3. trust in accuracy of descriptions, and 4. trust in journalistic assessment. 

This study recruited its participants from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) platform. There were a total of 1092 participants. They were presented with a news story about nanoparticles – a topic that was unfamiliar to most and therefore had a low risk of partisan opinions. The article was presented in six different webpages that had differing transparency items in them.

There were 11 different trust items in the first experiment. Based on the results, the hypotheses were rejected. They were H1: A a) production transparency news item and a b) producer transparency news item will be trusted more than a non-transparent item. H2: A full transparency (both production and producer transparency) news item will be trusted more than a) a non-transparent article, b) a production transparency article, and c) a producer transparency article. And H3a: A full transparency news item will be trusted more than a full transparent article that includes biased information about the producer. H3b: A producer transparency news item with neutral personal information will be trusted more than a producer transparency article with biased information.

Nevertheless, the participants agreed that the journalist was trustworthy and that they sometimes trusted the news media. On results, it was speculated that the participants did not recognize the transparency features as cognitive heuristics and did not interact much with the transparency items. 

The second experiment was similar. There were a total of 379 participants, who were not the same as in the first one. They were assigned to read the same article as in the first about nanoparticles, placed again on five different webpages with varying transparency features.  

Further on, the participants were asked to recall the transparency features (such as hyperlinks, author bio, editorial explanations etc.) and to recall specific information from the article and the transparency features. 

The participants recalled items such as the photo (84% of the ones assigned to the webpage with a photo) only 34% could correctly identify the journalist. Similarly, 53% of those who had seen an editorial explanation recalled it, but only 26% could recall a detail from it. Participants also had trouble recalling the individual transparency features they were exposed to.

It was noted that the participants had better recall on items that were part of the actual story than the ‘digitally outsourced’ transparency items. It is possible that this information is not adequately processed or they failed to acknowledge the utility of this information. 

In conclusion, it still remains unclear how the link between transparency and audience’s trust is created. The question remains on whether news consumers recognize transparency features as markers of journalistic quality.

The article “Trust and Journalistic Transparency Online” by Michael Koliska is in Journalism Studies. (open access). 

Picture: scrabble tiles spelling trust by Ronda Dorsey.

License Unsplash. 

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Journalism

News ideology and media storms in France and Israel

Patricia Cruz

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The article “What Happens in the Eye of the Storm? News Ideology During Media Storms” by Doron Shultziner from Hadassah Academic College looked at the nexus of news ideology and media storms using two media storms to analyze the topic: the Yellow Vests Movement (2018) in France and the Occupy Movement (2011) in Israel.

Media storms are defined as events or topics that take up a substantial part of the coverage for a period of time. They typically peak after few weeks in the beginning and then begin to fade. They have been studied widely with various terms being applied to them like “media event” or “media hypes”.

In the past 15 years, there has been an increase in the amount of studies on media ideology. Measured against the hypothetical gold standard of pure objectivity, media bias can be seen when coverage varies from source to another in different weighings and so on, with professional considerations having been overtaken by ideological ones.

The ideology is often seen in framing – as in this case, left-wing media tends to frame the protests positively and right-wing negatively. This was one of the topics in this study.
There were two data sets for the study: the Israeli one and the French one. The Israeli dataset consisted of coverage from Yedioth Ahronoth, Israel Hayom, Maariv, Haaretz, Makor Rishon (a national-religious newspaper), and Yated Neeman (an ultra-religious newspaper). Israel Hayom, Makor Rishon, and Yated Neeman are right-wing, the rest are left wing.

The French dataset consisted of coverage from Le Figaro, Le Monde, Libération, and L’Obs – listed here from right to left ideologically. The articles from both datasets were coded either positive, negative, or neutral based on several criteria.

The results show that media storms are a multi-media phenomenon, affecting a number of newspapers at once. The findings also demonstrate a media bias: if professional considerations were the only thing that mattered, the coverage in left- and right-wing media would have resembled each other.

Instead, there was a trend of negative coverage in right-wing media and positive in left – and what is more, the lines of coverage moved to opposite directions, showing increased polarization. There were differences between the storms: in the Israel case the newspapers chose their sides early and there was no significant move, but in France the lines diverged as the media storm went on.

News ideology also operated through production bias mechanisms, such as sizing of articles or their placement in the newspaper (front page or somewhere else). Due to the differences of the two cases, the hypotheses regarding the decline stage of the storm were hard to assess.

The author notes that the study has implications for future research. It proposes that media storms may be high-risk events that even challenge the ideology and interests of the news organizations. As important, politically charged events become media storms, they may become political storms instead.

The article “What Happens in the Eye of the Storm? News Ideology During Media Storms” by Doron Shultziner is in International Journal of Communication. (free access).

Picture: Storm Approaching by Johannes Plenio @jplenio.
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Journalism

Covering women’s sport: My sports journalism career highlights

Patricia Cruz

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There has never been a better time to work in women’s sport and for early-career sports reporters, the opportunities are endless.

Here, multimedia sports reporter Milly McEvoy shares how she has covered everything from the Olympics and Paralympics to international women’s cricket and football tournaments, only a year after finishing her sports journalism course.

In June 2021, fresh off finishing my Multimedia Sports Journalism qualification with in Manchester, I made the move down to London to join Sportsbeat as a reporter.

It feels like a lifetime ago, but what has come in between also feels like a blur – it has involved international rugby and football, the British Athletics Championships and domestic cricket and netball (and lots more) in person. 

I have also covered the Summer Olympics and Paralympics, Wimbledon, the Commonwealth Games, remotely and I have had the opportunity to interview sportspeople involved from the grassroots to the top of the game. 

On top of all that, I spent two months covering the Women’s Cricket World Cup in New Zealand. 

As I came to the end of my history degree in 2020, I already knew I wanted to be a sports journalist, but I started thinking about what form that would take. 

I quickly settled on women’s sport. 

I had always kept an eye on women’s sport, and proudly say the first sporting event I ever attended was a Women’s Euros football match in 2005, but my interest in sport came from what was easily available – and even two years ago most women’s sport wasn’t. 

2020 was a slippery slope to full-on obsession including listening to the 2020 Women’s T20 World Cup final on 8 March in the early morning on the radio. 

Even across the airwaves, the sound of 86,174 people packing into the MCG showed to me that there was plenty of appetite for women’s sport, people just need to be able to see it – and read about it. 

Fast forward two years and Australia were winning another World Cup, but this time, I was there to see it with my own eyes before heading to the press conference to speak with captain Meg Lanning. 

What had led to that point at around 9pm on 3 April 2022 was two months covering one of the most exciting tournaments cricket has ever seen, and I’m luckily not yet jaded enough to have cursed having to rewrite my match reports as momentum swung wildly in several games. 

I learnt so much from covering that World Cup producing over 120 previews, reports, reaction pieces and features, but my favourite one was the last thing I did in Aotearoa, speaking with a slightly hungover Grace Harris the day after she had won the World Cup. 

Having returned to the UK, I enjoyed a full circle moment in July as I covered the Women’s Euros, and just like the 2020 T20 World Cup, I watched from afar as 87,192 fans cheered the home team to victory. 

Except, this time I was writing the match report for the Lionesses and I couldn’t get into the Wembley press box because there were so many people eager to cover women’s sports. 

It feels like England’s win will be a turning point for women’s sport, one that is long overdue, and I am excited to be part of what is to come and grateful and proud to have been a small part of what has already been. 

You can find out more about our multimedia sports journalism course here.

For a taster of our award-winning journalism training, sign up for one of our free workshops here.

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