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Special Issue in Digital Journalism about Covid-19

Patricia Cruz

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Recent special issue, Volume 9, Issue 9 (2021) in Digital Journalism “Covering Covid-19: The Coronavirus Pandemic as a Critical Moment for Digital Journalism” has been recently published and is available. The issue is here with the contents. Here is some information about the eleven articles with links:

In the introductory article “The Coronavirus Pandemic as a Critical Moment for Digital Journalism”  Thorsten Quandt and Karin Wahl-Jorgensen argue that the Covid-19 has been a critical moment for journalism, and ponder the developments that moment has spurred in digital journalism.

In the article “Does a Crisis Change News Habits? A Comparative Study of the Effects of COVID-19 on News Media Use in 17 European Countries” Peter van Aelst et al. investigate the extent to which the pandemic has affected news consumption habits using the concept of ‘need for orientation’.

Next, in the article “Journalism as Usual? Managing Disruption in Virtual Newsrooms during the COVID-19 Crisis” Jose A. García-Avilés utilizes Harvey’s (2006) lens for theorization of space to look at how news executives during the Covid-19 pandemic implemented journalistic practices and processes. 

Claudia Mellado et al. in the article “Sourcing Pandemic News: A Cross-National Computational Analysis of Mainstream Media Coverage of COVID-19 on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram” look at how sources were used in 78 news outlets in seven countries:  Brazil, Chile, Germany, Mexico, Spain, the U.K., and the U.S. 

Kiki de Bruin,Yael de Haan,Rens Vliegenthart,Sanne Kruikemeier and Mark Boukes conducted panel surveys to explore news avoidance for perceived well-being of consumers in “News Avoidance during the Covid-19 Crisis: Understanding Information Overload”.

The article “Data “Objectivity” in a Time of Coronavirus: Uncovering the Potential Impact of State Influence on the Production of Data-Driven News” by Shangyuan Wu critically discusses the social constructionist nature of data journalism by focusing on Singapore, a globally oriented city in Asia that had been praised for its Covid-19 response. 

Less traditional media is studied in the article “Conceptualizing “Dark Platforms”. Covid-19-Related Conspiracy Theories on 8kun and Gab” by Jing Zeng and Mike S. Schäfer. They look at how Covid-19 conspiracy theories, and other Covid-19 content, is communicated in the so-called ‘dark platforms’ of the net.

Lambrini Papadopoulou & Theodora A. Maniou in “‘Lockdown’ on Digital Journalism? Mapping Threats to Press Freedom during the COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis” argue that the emergency measures to safeguard public health have been used by numerous governments as a pretext for restrictions against critical journalism. 

““Flatten the Curve”: Data-Driven Projections and the Journalistic Brokering of Knowledge during the COVID-19 Crisis” by Christian Pentzold, Denise J. Fechner and Conrad Zuber, examines the intertwining of journalistic forecasts, epidemiological modelling, and policy measures in how possibilities for the pandemic were presented.

The article “The Reconfiguration of News Work in Southern Africa during the COVID-19 Pandemic” by Phillip Santos and Admire Mare looks at how some newsrooms in Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe responded to the imposition of lockdown measures.

In “Competing Frames and Melodrama: The Effects of Facebook Posts on Policy Preferences about COVID-19” Sebastián Valenzuela et al. examines the framing contest of proponents and opponents of lockdown measures. The study was an online survey in Chile. 

Finally, the article “Making Sense of Pandemic-Induced Changes in Journalism and Beyond” by Eun-Ju Lee reviews the articles in the issue to conclude that Covid-19 has undoubtedly affected journalism in all levels and presents some recommendations for future research.

Picture: Street art – graffiti with facial mask on the wall during the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in Warsaw, Poland by Adam Nieścioruk.

License Unsplash.

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Journalism

The Top Journalism Websites for News and Analysis”

Alice Trout

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Journalism plays an essential role in keeping the public informed about current events and issues. The internet has made it easier than ever to access a wide range of news and analysis from reputable sources. Here are some of the best journalism sites for keeping up-to-date on the latest happenings around the world:

  1. The New York Times (www.nytimes.com) – The New York Times is a well-respected newspaper that has been in operation for over 150 years. It offers a wide range of news and analysis on politics, business, technology, and culture.
  2. The Washington Post (www.washingtonpost.com) – The Washington Post is another well-respected newspaper that has been in operation for over 150 years. It offers in-depth coverage of national and international news, as well as commentary on politics, business, and more.
  3. The Guardian (www.theguardian.com) – The Guardian is a British newspaper that offers a wide range of news and analysis on politics, business, technology, and culture. It has a strong reputation for investigative journalism and has won numerous awards.
  4. BBC News (www.bbc.com/news) – BBC News is the online news division of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). It offers a wide range of news and analysis on international, national, and regional events.
  5. Al Jazeera (www.aljazeera.com) – Al Jazeera is a Qatari news organization that offers a wide range of news and analysis on international, national, and regional events. It has a strong reputation for its coverage of the Middle East and North Africa.
  6. Reuters (www.reuters.com) – Reuters is a global news organization that offers a wide range of news and analysis on international, national, and regional events. It has a strong reputation for its coverage of business and financial news.
  7. CNN (www.cnn.com) – CNN is a global news organization that offers a wide range of news and analysis on international, national, and regional events. It has a strong reputation for its coverage of breaking news and live events.
  8. The Economist (www.economist.com) – The Economist is a British magazine that offers a wide range of news and analysis on international, national, and regional events, with a focus on economics and politics.
  9. The Atlantic (www.theatlantic.com) – The Atlantic is an American magazine that offers a wide range of news and analysis on international, national, and regional events, with a focus on politics, culture, and technology.
  10. ProPublica (www.propublica.org) – ProPublica is a non-profit organization that focuses on investigative journalism. It has a strong reputation for its coverage of politics, business, and social issues.

Guest blogging is a highly effective marketing strategy that every business should be utilizing. By purchasing PR publications, you can increase traffic and establish authority.

These are just a few examples of the many great journalism websites that are available. Whether you’re looking for breaking news, in-depth analysis, or a particular perspective on current events, these sites are an excellent starting point.

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Journalism

The Ethics of Healthcare Advertising: Balancing the Right to Information with the Risk of Deception

Alice Trout

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Healthcare advertising has the potential to inform and educate the public about important medical treatments and products, but it must be done in an ethical and responsible manner. On one hand, the public has the right to access information about healthcare options that may improve their quality of life or save their lives. On the other hand, there is a risk that healthcare advertising could deceive or mislead consumers, leading to negative consequences for both the companies and the public.

One issue with healthcare advertising is the promotion of prescription drugs for off-label use. Off-label use refers to the use of a drug for a purpose that has not been approved by the regulatory agency, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. While it is not illegal for doctors to prescribe drugs for off-label use, it is illegal for pharmaceutical companies to promote drugs for off-label use. This is because the FDA has not determined that the drug is safe and effective for the unapproved use.

Unfortunately, some pharmaceutical companies have been known to engage in off-label promotion in order to increase sales. This can be harmful to patients, as they may be prescribed a drug that has not been thoroughly tested for the specific condition they are suffering from. In some cases, off-label use of a drug can even be dangerous.

Another issue with healthcare advertising is the use of exaggerated or misleading claims. This can include making false or unproven statements about the effectiveness of a drug or treatment, or downplaying the risks and side effects. Such practices can lead to consumers making informed decisions about their healthcare, and can also harm the reputation of the healthcare industry as a whole.

In order to strike a balance between the right to information and the risk of deception, it is important for both regulatory agencies and the healthcare industry to prioritize ethical practices in healthcare advertising. This can include measures such as strict oversight by regulatory agencies, clear guidelines for the approval and review of advertising materials, and campaigns to educate the public about how to evaluate and interpret healthcare advertising. By taking these steps, we can ensure that the public has access to accurate and reliable information about healthcare options, while also protecting against deceptive practices that can harm both consumers and the healthcare industry.

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Journalism

Supporting Startup Founders’ Mental Health: The Importance of Prioritizing Well-Being in the Fast-Paced Startup World

Alice Trout

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As the startup world continues to thrive and grow, it’s important to recognize that the fast-paced, high-stress environment can take a toll on the mental health of founders and employees. In fact, research has shown that entrepreneurs are at a higher risk for mental health issues such as anxiety and depression compared to the general population.

One key factor that contributes to this risk is the pressure to succeed and the fear of failure that can come with starting and running a business. Additionally, the long hours and lack of work-life balance that are often associated with the startup world can also contribute to mental health challenges.

It’s essential that startups prioritize the mental health of their founders and employees, not only for the well-being of the individual, but also for the overall success of the business. Research has shown that mental health issues can negatively impact productivity and decision-making, which can have serious consequences for a company.

There are a few steps that startups can take to support the mental health of their team members:

  1. Encourage open communication and create a safe space for employees to talk about their mental health concerns.
  2. Offer resources such as counseling and mental health benefits to employees.
  3. Foster a culture of self-care by promoting healthy habits such as regular exercise and proper nutrition.
  4. Set boundaries and encourage work-life balance to prevent burnout.

For those not ready to go to the doctor or looking for support, mental health startups Europe offer help through apps.

It’s important to remember that mental health is just as important as physical health, and it’s crucial that startups prioritize the well-being of their founders and employees. By taking steps to support the mental health of their team, startups can create a positive and healthy work environment that leads to success for both the business and its employees.

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